The Shame of Being a Disabled Person

Since childhood, I have carried around a sense of shame about being disabled. Alongside that, I have also been disappointed in myself for having those feelings. It’s impossible to watch the Paralympics (with all of these disabled athletes living their best lives) and not feel like I should be doing more. It’s impossible not to feel like I should be happier and more comfortable with my apparent adversity. All of this was true, until I had a recent realisation:

The pressure to feel better is directly related to allowing others to be more comfortable — to create a space where they don’t perceive me to be living a life that is wasted. Of course, this type of attitude is one that I wish could be removed from society completely, but there is some truth to it. Sometimes, pretending otherwise can be tiring, especially when it only serves to allow people not to feel so awkward when staring at me in the street. Like, it’s apparent from my previous posts here that there are some aspects of my life that have been halted or made more difficult by disability, but happiness is not made nonexistent by such a reality. It is possible to find a weird sense of harmony between the two, which I wish could be more widely understood.

For example: in about February of this year, before the pandemic hit in earnest, I went to Starbucks with my cousin and family. We were happily gossiping about the trails and tribulations of our dating lives at the time, when a stranger approached us and handed me a leaflet. He said that he couldn’t imagine how unbearable my circumstances must be, but that he was willing to help me find “a life without wheels”, through the power of prayer. I’m a loser and hate confrontation, so I politely thanked him and headed into the nearest bathroom to cry. At the time, I had been really struggling with my body image and generally didn’t feel great about myself, so the whole thing was very bad timing. For me, perhaps the saddest part of this interaction was that I’d been having a genuinely nice day, until that moment. I had been laughing in the seconds before he spoke to me, yet he was entirely focused on highlighting the glaringly obvious negativities.

When drafting this post, I had initially wrote: to be honest, I wish that he had been right. I mean, imagine if fixing everything really was that simple. But let’s unpack that idea, in hopes of demonstrating how damaging these well-meaning gestures can be. Firstly, there is no cure for Cerebral Palsy, so taking away my wheelchair would truly be no life at all, even when I do struggle to accept my dependence on it. Secondly, isn’t it heartbreaking that one conversation can leave me feeling so broken? Especially when it probably wasn’t at all significant to the other party.

Moving forward, I will strive to live without shame. Your misplaced guilt and pity is not my problem, so I can promise that I’ll be fine without your prayers. This body is mine, for better or worse. Sometimes, that can be a beautiful thing. Please allow me to try and outweigh the bad with the good throughout 2021. Already, this blog has received more overwhelming love and support than I ever could have hoped for. It has brought a certain strength to my friendships, both old and new. Maybe — just maybe — I’ll never hide in a bathroom again. Let that be my New Year’s Resolution, okay? One blog post at a time. xxx

PS: as promised, here’s a shoutout to my brother, Jack. He wants me to remind everyone that he is, in fact, Carer of the Year. Not really, but still.

If you have a question that you have always felt weird about asking directly, hit me up on CuriousCat! Yay for anonymity. I’m all about that education and will do a post on it in January, if there’s anything. https://curiouscat.qa/Disabled_Danielle97

4 thoughts on “The Shame of Being a Disabled Person

  1. God I love reading your blogs!
    So intriguing and real.
    Imagine if you didn’t have to worry about what others felt about you, so freeing.
    Living life for yourself is a must, whether disabled or not. It’s a human trait to want to impress or been seen in a good light but as you get older life gets shorter and the gift of life is yours and only yours. You want to gravitate to what fills you up! We might not have the freedom to change what we want to change but our thoughts are wholly ours and that’s a powerful thing.
    Well done Danielle
    I look forward to more of your blogs!

    Like

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