The Trauma of Being Disabled

Unfortunately, being disabled is often associated with some level of trauma, even if only through the way that it has been perceived by society. On a personal level, research has shown that adults with Cerebral Palsy are statistically more likely to be diagnosed with mental health problems such as depression and anxiety than those without.

When I was fourteen, one of my doctors randomly asked about my social life. I had been getting ready to leave the appointment and the question caught me completely off-guard. I couldn’t understand why that was relevant in any way, so tried to lie and tell her that I was generally pretty popular. In reality, I was decidedly unpopular and very depressed about my whole situation, though I didn’t have the language to express that back then. Just a few weeks before, I had started seeing the school counsellor, but left after the first session and never went back. Still today, I remember her looking at me enter the room and saying: “well, I can already tell why you’re here”. The whole interaction was fairly damaging — it felt like the only thing that anyone ever saw when looking at me, you know? So, when this doctor asked about my social life, my mum wasted no time in exposing the lie and asking for help. They promised to refer me to a therapist that specialised in working with disabled young people, but I never heard anything. It has been almost nine years and there was never any follow-up.

When I was about twenty, I cried in front of my GP about how bad my body image was (I had been there for an entirely different reason). Afterwards, we both just pretended that it had never happened. In that moment, the only advice that she could give me was to “focus on self-care and personal grooming”.

As I reflect upon these two examples of pivotal moments in my life, it’s difficult for me to even place responsibility or blame onto these professionals in any way. See, the key problem is that nobody truly knows how to help or understand. They can’t really be expected to, since the circumstances are complex beyond anybody’s imagination, so it’s probably not something that they are faced with on a regular basis. However, what it also means is that I’m left unable to truly understand myself, either.

Last night, I had a lengthy conversation with my good friend, Sonia. She is very wise and brilliant. She reminded me of how illness and being constantly surrounded by ignorance (however unintentional) causes your brain to be shaped differently to everyone else around you. You know, studying in a mainstream school when there are so many voices insisting that you don’t belong in that space kind of forces you to become mature very quickly, for example. It is almost like a protective barrier, which only creates a lifetime of difference, since it’s impossible for anyone else to be on exactly the same wavelength without experiencing those things. This is day one of my journey towards accepting and acknowledging that I have been through some heavy stuff, but that things do have the capacity to be better. To anyone reading this, even if we are not in touch, I want to thank you for coming along on the ride with me.

Reminder to self: I do not have to be defined by other people’s shitty treatment of me. It is possible to grow past that and move forward. I am determined to make sure that these experiences mean something.

My next post is going to be about disability and identity. I have some feelings about that myself, but it’d be cool to get some other perspectives, too! If you are disabled or chronically ill and want to have a conversation about it, send me a message. Let’s change the world. xxx

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2 thoughts on “The Trauma of Being Disabled

  1. Danielle I love the way you write. Thank you for being you and how honest and true you are. I really admire your strength and courage in all of this. Life can be tough but it most definitely does not have to define who we are or what our next chapter is. I see you I hear you and I’m so very lucky to know you I would like to get to know you better. Trauma is definitely something we are all dealt with within our lives but it’s how we manage the trauma that really shows strength it’s okay to feel powerless and weak and it’s okay to ask for help your voice will really help others to be true and to hopefully speak up. Sending you the biggest hug. Xxx

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    1. Ignore me writing back at almost 2am on a Friday 🤣🤣🤣 but thank-you so much. I was awake just feeling my feelings about everything & your words have made me feel so much better. It really does mean the entire world to me!!! It is a privilege to know you & please know that your consistent warmth has helped me beyond words over the years. LET’S BE FRIENDS for real, okay because you can message me any time. All love xxxxxx

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