Challenging Accessibility in a Global Pandemic

The world has always felt like a very scary place for me to exist within. For the longest time, it was dangerously easy to internalise this as being my fault. I was convinced that all of my problems would be solved, if only I could learn to be slightly less socially anxious, you know? However, I am starting to realise that these feelings have been perpetuated by a desire to shrink myself and ensure that my needs didn’t inconvenience other people, which I refuse to do anymore. So, I’m going to write about a few experiences where inaccessibility hugely damaged my quality of life, in ways that the general population has probably never even had to think about before. Maybe you’ll feel called out for not questioning this stuff on a daily basis, but I want you to know that it’s okay. I’m not going to be invisible for another moment longer. Let’s all agree to do better, moving forward.

I will never forget the time that an old friend had a birthday party during our teenage years where all of the guests (also my friends) were told: “don’t tell Danielle. I’m not inviting her because my house isn’t accessible and I don’t want her to feel left out”. Spoiler alert: I heard the gossip pretty quickly. For future reference, it’s always nice to have a conversation and know that someone is thinking of me, rather than to feel very intentionally excluded. I don’t expect people to centre their entire plans around my existence, of course, though it would be cool to feel like my presence matters enough to warrant some consideration. Because that, I suppose, is the entire point: disabled people’s lives do not matter enough within society to earn a second thought from those that the issues do not directly affect. We are not invited to take up space in pubs and clubs, for example, because we don’t belong where everyone else goes to have fun. Well, frankly, I have had enough.

As another example: when I started college and finally found somewhere to properly fit in, I was delighted when a group of new friends asked me to hang out with them one evening. Although the gesture itself might sound small, let’s remember that it hadn’t happened many times before, so this immediately felt like my life had reached a turning point for the better. Additionally, these people are lovely and considerate, so even made a phone call to our chosen venue to check that everything was wheelchair-friendly. After being given assurances that there wouldn’t be any problems, I was safe and ready to start enjoying myself. Unfortunately, though, the story doesn’t end there. When we arrived, it became apparent that there were stairs by the entrance and no ramp available. Needless to say, I went home and tried to pretend that it was no big deal.

A few years later, I wanted to take a bus from university campus to the centre of town. Public transport generally stresses me out, but my friend was involved with a local art exhibition and I wanted to be supportive. Besides, there’s nothing wrong with trying to be a bit more independent, right? On this particular day, however, the ramp was broken. Eventually, this led to some well-meaning strangers attempting to push me onboard instead. I have nothing to say about this, except: don’t touch mobility aids without consent, people. In response to all of this, I simply left the scene very quickly and cried to my mum about it later. Every single time that I have tried to be like everyone else, something goes wrong, leaving me unnecessarily vulnerable.

A screenshot of a Tweet by Lucy Dawson, which reads: “was just sat thinking gosh I hope the world doesn’t forget about us disabled & chronically ill ppl when the pandemic ends but then recalled that much of the world has yet to actually remember us in the first place so anyway. AS U WERE, LD. X”
Just don’t forget that disabled people exist. It doesn’t feel like too much to ask.

Interestingly, although the world’s current circumstances are overwhelmingly horrific, this pandemic has forced the world to become more accessible. Classes have been moved online with relative ease (thanks to the lecturer that told me this type of thing would be too complicated and unfair on everyone else when I was very unwell), working from home is now more socially acceptable and there has been an increase in job opportunities for those with limited mobility or fluctuating health conditions. Not only that, but social events are almost entirely virtual, which takes away many of the physical accessibility concerns for disabled people. In short, now that these options have been made available, I refuse to watch them be taken away entirely just because they make everyone else feel as if life is not being lived to the fullest. There has to be some kind of balance, which we should all be determined to find.

A screenshot of a Tweet by Charis Hill, which reads: “Hey folks who want everything to go back to normal:  Disabled people really need you to finally get it:  #BackToNormalIsAbleist”
The short version of this post is essentially summarised here. Enjoy.

To Kesia, thanks for being the inspiration behind this piece. You are a wonderful friend and I will forever enjoy our rants about social injustice. Dearest Owen, I can’t wait to go on adventures with you. Thank-you for reminding me that the fight will always be worth it. xxx