Finding Disability Pride in a Global Pandemic

Until recently, I have always actively avoided attaching myself to any notion of disability pride. If I’m being completely transparent, I hoped that this defiance might somehow allow me to wake up one morning with the ability to walk — or even stand. There is no logic to this thought pattern whatsoever, I know, but I do still have dreams about it sometimes. It’s hard to describe what it feels like to wake up from these places with the briefest hope that they have become a reality. If you were wondering, the first thing that I’d do in this instance would be to find my parents and shout “surprise!” in the most casual tone that I could muster. Afterwards, I would immediately go for a shower. Independently. What a wild concept. Also, I have always thought that jumping looks like so much fun, even if only on the spot. Is it fun? The simplest of things, really. Yes, I have planned it. Just in case. But when that doesn’t happen, what am I left with? I have spent half my life genuinely believing that it was impossible for me to happily exist in a disabled body. Let me tell you, friends, the ugliness of this pandemic has led to the most beautifully wild and liberating revelation: I was wrong. There will always be a lot of noise to the contrary, but disabled lives are full. Disabled lives are good. Disabled lives are worthwhile. Disabled voices are important, even when (and perhaps because) policy consistently works to suggest otherwise. So, let’s talk about that, please.

Here we are again. In the United Kingdom, most restrictions are officially set to be lifted on July 19th, despite warnings that this could cause our case numbers to reach one hundred thousand per day. But most clinically vulnerable people have been fully vaccinated now, so who cares, right? The amount of times that I have heard this argument within my own social circle is both disappointing and not at all surprising. The fact remains that recent research raises doubts over vaccine effectiveness for immunocompromised people. In all honesty, I have been trying really hard to simply avoid fully processing this information and stay positive about the potential outcomes, which may sound irresponsible, but it’s also deeply important to my emotional stability. Because what type of message is this supposed to send, really? From where I’m sitting, the answer is a painfully obvious one: nobody cares. The lives of disabled people are inherently less valuable than opening nightclubs, for example. Once again, it has been decided by the people in positions of power that we are disposable. Well, excuse me if I’m done being quiet about this bullshit.

A screenshot of a Tweet by Karl Knights, which reads: “Not gonna lie, I am very much not fine. Having the government, and your peers, just outright say that they don't care if disabled people die is as enraging as it is upsetting.”
I am leaving this here because I have A Lot of feelings. The world is especially rough for disabled people right now and it’s okay to just sit in the sadness for a while, if you need to.

See, having a disabled and/or chronically ill body isn’t easy, especially in moments such as these. The subtle ways in which society is ready to tear us down for its own benefit can become twisted into our own brains and leave irreparable damage. But guess what? The idea of getting on other people’s nerves by existing loudly and happily motivates me more than anything else. This year, that is enough to fill me with pride, which I haven’t experienced before. I mean, let’s be real. It requires a lot of Bad Bitch Energy not to give up on yourself when your needs are very clearly seen as inconveniencing the general population. Similarly, it also requires a lot of Bad Bitch Energy to take up space in the rooms where difference is not welcomed. News flash: if you’re reading this, you haven’t given up on yourself, either. What a powerful moment.

To the non-disabled readers, thank-you for caring enough to listen. Thank-you for reaching out and offering solidarity. You give me hope that the future can be better.

Zoe, thank-you for always believing in me and filling my messages with words of wisdom. You are brilliant and bright, even on hard days. Owen, thank-you for teaching me the power behind being unapologetically myself. I love you. xxx