How to Handle Having a Disabled Child

Recently, someone told me that they wouldn’t publicly celebrate having a disabled child. More than that, they told me that this supposedly joyous event would be tarnished by thoughts of guilt and shame — almost as if it was some kind of personal failing. This conversation has been holding hands with the dark part of my brain ever since, in all honesty. However, it has also brought some empowerment, weirdly enough. I mean, it’s interesting, isn’t it? Despite the fact that I’m a disabled person, it still felt okay to share these feelings with me, perhaps because it’s unfathomable that I wouldn’t resent my existence in the same way that everyone else does. Surprise! I am, in fact, thriving. It’s possible to be happy even when the rest of the world expects otherwise, you know?

This feels like an important message to put across simply because it’s impossible to pretend that it’s an isolated opinion. It runs through the very fabric of our society, often without most people even acknowledging that it’s deeply problematic. Before you say it, I’m not just being dramatic. Throughout my education, there were several moments where I would have to sit and listen as my peers were asked to debate whether or not disabled lives were equal to their own. Some of the responses were, frankly, jarring and left me anxiously picking my fingernails every time.

I would tell myself repeatedly that it’d get better with age and maturity, which I allowed myself to believe until starting university. During one of the first icebreaker social events, someone immediately asked if I was adopted, without doing the same to anyone else. I laugh whenever I think about this, because even if it had been true, it’s still absolutely none of their business. The meaning behind it was clear, though: they couldn’t allow themselves to imagine that my biological parents would want to keep me around, before even knowing anything about me. At the time, I was having many different conversations with members of staff about only managing to build one strong relationship on campus. I was always told “everyone probably feels uncomfortable around you and wants to avoid saying the wrong thing, so they have just decided to avoid saying anything at all”. Not for the first time, I was made to feel like all of this stuff was my fault and not something that could be fixed by anyone else.

Together, all of this becomes an attack on the very essence of my being. Writing is the only way that I know how to fight back in these situations, so here we are, once again.

A screenshot of a Tweet by Jenn M. Jackson, which reads: "Nothing I accept about myself can be used against me to diminish me." - Audre Lorde”
I will not be diminished. The lives of disabled children can be (and are) filled with joy. That should never be something that any parent regrets.

I am eternally grateful to my parents for choosing me every day, even when it meant making sacrifices that wouldn’t otherwise have been expected of them, especially during a time where there was significantly less support available. Fun fact: Cerebral Palsy is widely considered to be a paediatric condition. I’m still waiting to be magically cured since reaching adulthood, though I haven’t had any luck yet. In all seriousness: it does mean that we have had to handle a lot by ourselves over the last couple of years, but my life is still important. My life is good. Having a disabled child is not an overwhelmingly negative experience, even if it doesn’t meet your unrealistic ideals around what a family should look like. Disabled children deserve to not spend their time consumed with feeling like an unwanted burden. Radical, I know.

Dearest Owen, your light is brighter than you will ever know. I love you.

PS: I wrote a piece on accessibility for Scope, which you can read here, if you feel like being a massive nerd about it. I am changing the world, one blog post at a time. xoxo

Challenging Accessibility in a Global Pandemic

The world has always felt like a very scary place for me to exist within. For the longest time, it was dangerously easy to internalise this as being my fault. I was convinced that all of my problems would be solved, if only I could learn to be slightly less socially anxious, you know? However, I am starting to realise that these feelings have been perpetuated by a desire to shrink myself and ensure that my needs didn’t inconvenience other people, which I refuse to do anymore. So, I’m going to write about a few experiences where inaccessibility hugely damaged my quality of life, in ways that the general population has probably never even had to think about before. Maybe you’ll feel called out for not questioning this stuff on a daily basis, but I want you to know that it’s okay. I’m not going to be invisible for another moment longer. Let’s all agree to do better, moving forward.

I will never forget the time that an old friend had a birthday party during our teenage years where all of the guests (also my friends) were told: “don’t tell Danielle. I’m not inviting her because my house isn’t accessible and I don’t want her to feel left out”. Spoiler alert: I heard the gossip pretty quickly. For future reference, it’s always nice to have a conversation and know that someone is thinking of me, rather than to feel very intentionally excluded. I don’t expect people to centre their entire plans around my existence, of course, though it would be cool to feel like my presence matters enough to warrant some consideration. Because that, I suppose, is the entire point: disabled people’s lives do not matter enough within society to earn a second thought from those that the issues do not directly affect. We are not invited to take up space in pubs and clubs, for example, because we don’t belong where everyone else goes to have fun. Well, frankly, I have had enough.

As another example: when I started college and finally found somewhere to properly fit in, I was delighted when a group of new friends asked me to hang out with them one evening. Although the gesture itself might sound small, let’s remember that it hadn’t happened many times before, so this immediately felt like my life had reached a turning point for the better. Additionally, these people are lovely and considerate, so even made a phone call to our chosen venue to check that everything was wheelchair-friendly. After being given assurances that there wouldn’t be any problems, I was safe and ready to start enjoying myself. Unfortunately, though, the story doesn’t end there. When we arrived, it became apparent that there were stairs by the entrance and no ramp available. Needless to say, I went home and tried to pretend that it was no big deal.

A few years later, I wanted to take a bus from university campus to the centre of town. Public transport generally stresses me out, but my friend was involved with a local art exhibition and I wanted to be supportive. Besides, there’s nothing wrong with trying to be a bit more independent, right? On this particular day, however, the ramp was broken. Eventually, this led to some well-meaning strangers attempting to push me onboard instead. I have nothing to say about this, except: don’t touch mobility aids without consent, people. In response to all of this, I simply left the scene very quickly and cried to my mum about it later. Every single time that I have tried to be like everyone else, something goes wrong, leaving me unnecessarily vulnerable.

A screenshot of a Tweet by Lucy Dawson, which reads: “was just sat thinking gosh I hope the world doesn’t forget about us disabled & chronically ill ppl when the pandemic ends but then recalled that much of the world has yet to actually remember us in the first place so anyway. AS U WERE, LD. X”
Just don’t forget that disabled people exist. It doesn’t feel like too much to ask.

Interestingly, although the world’s current circumstances are overwhelmingly horrific, this pandemic has forced the world to become more accessible. Classes have been moved online with relative ease (thanks to the lecturer that told me this type of thing would be too complicated and unfair on everyone else when I was very unwell), working from home is now more socially acceptable and there has been an increase in job opportunities for those with limited mobility or fluctuating health conditions. Not only that, but social events are almost entirely virtual, which takes away many of the physical accessibility concerns for disabled people. In short, now that these options have been made available, I refuse to watch them be taken away entirely just because they make everyone else feel as if life is not being lived to the fullest. There has to be some kind of balance, which we should all be determined to find.

A screenshot of a Tweet by Charis Hill, which reads: “Hey folks who want everything to go back to normal:  Disabled people really need you to finally get it:  #BackToNormalIsAbleist”
The short version of this post is essentially summarised here. Enjoy.

To Kesia, thanks for being the inspiration behind this piece. You are a wonderful friend and I will forever enjoy our rants about social injustice. Dearest Owen, I can’t wait to go on adventures with you. Thank-you for reminding me that the fight will always be worth it. xxx

Learning to Love My Disabled Identity

For so many years, I thought that the key to survival was to run away from my disability, even if only emotionally. I thought that being known as the disabled girl would define my whole sense of self, ensuring that nobody cared about anything else. However, actively pretending that it doesn’t exist only served to send me into a spiral of self-hatred. Once this had begun, it was impossible to escape from and has constantly haunted the edges of my brain for almost a decade, if not longer. However, things have finally started to change over the past couple of days. It is like a dark fog has been lifted, simply from refusing to hide anymore and believing that I am capable of better.

Firstly, I learned that this blog has been viewed over one thousand times already. My weird little blog. If we know each other well enough to be connected on social media, then you probably already know that part. Truthfully, my head is still spinning. It is so difficult to comprehend how so many people care about reading my story, however briefly. My voice has always just felt pretty invisible, you know? It has often been like screaming into the void with nobody to hear. I can’t remember a time where I didn’t feel like a disappointing disabled person because I had nothing especially remarkable to offer the world. However, hitting this milestone proves my stupid brain wrong. It makes me feel like the possibilities are endless, although that probably won’t last long. Still, maybe my existence doesn’t have to be entirely mundane after all. For example: generally, I hate talking about my career prospects because writing has always felt like home for me, but I have always worried that I’m not good enough for it to be achievable. Now, for the first time, there is a glimmer of hope. For the first time ever, I am actually proud of myself. Can you believe it?! If you are reading this, you have collectively changed my life and I’m never going to be able to repay you.

Then, I posted on a disability support group and requested friends in a similar situation. I have never done anything like that before because the idea of being so vulnerable makes me feel physically sick, but I was so horribly alone and sad. Being young and disabled can be horribly lonely and sad — that’s the unfortunate reality. Frankly, I had expected to be completely ignored. At this point in time, it really didn’t feel like I mattered very much at all. Instead, over two-hundred people responded. Over two-hundred wonderful and warm human beings from around the world shared their stories with me, opening their hearts up to a friendship. I still haven’t been able to message all of them properly in the way that I would like, simply because there are not enough hours in the day. Even so, it has felt like I have been floating on a happy little cloud ever since. Until this moment, I had never before been embraced so tightly for my differences. Collectively, these people have saved me in ways that I’ll never fully be able to articulate. I’m still not completely convinced that I deserve each and every one of their beautifully kind gestures, but I’m determined to earn them. Their unconditional acceptance has allowed me to begin extending myself the same courtesy and it so deeply liberating. Being disabled can be a beautiful thing, too.

Also today, I received my first vaccine against COVID-19. I haven’t left the house much at all in the past year, so I was really very anxious about this whole process, but it all went smoothly. Since the pandemic first began, I have wanted to crawl outside of my own skin and be someone else. Anyone else. I deeply resented having to take so many extra steps in order to simply stay alive, so this feels like the beginning of brighter days. As a side note: my favourite mental health YouTuber has now acknowledged my existence on Twitter twice, so it feels like I have made it. Kidding, but still.

A woman (Danielle, the author of this blog) is smiling in the car and wearing a seatbelt. She is wearing glasses, a red jacket and black vest. She has messy hair but she doesn’t care.
This bitch got vaccinated: a picture taken after my appointment.

In short, I am not completely comfortable as a disabled young woman yet. I want to feel attractive and confident, so there is more work to be done. But representation is important to that process, so I’m going to continue to write until the world has changed for the better. I might even start a YouTube channel. Maybe. If I can get over my fear of the camera. But probably not. If you want to help me on this journey, please sign my gorgeous friend’s petition for a film with a disabled Disney princess here and don’t watch Sia’s new film ever. Give disabled actors the roles of disabled characters and don’t be a dick xoxo

PS: an extra special shout-out to my pals Imogen, Sophie, Céline and Jasmine. You will have a piece of my heart forever.

The Trauma of Being Disabled

Unfortunately, being disabled is often associated with some level of trauma, even if only through the way that it has been perceived by society. On a personal level, research has shown that adults with Cerebral Palsy are statistically more likely to be diagnosed with mental health problems such as depression and anxiety than those without.

When I was fourteen, one of my doctors randomly asked about my social life. I had been getting ready to leave the appointment and the question caught me completely off-guard. I couldn’t understand why that was relevant in any way, so tried to lie and tell her that I was generally pretty popular. In reality, I was decidedly unpopular and very depressed about my whole situation, though I didn’t have the language to express that back then. Just a few weeks before, I had started seeing the school counsellor, but left after the first session and never went back. Still today, I remember her looking at me enter the room and saying: “well, I can already tell why you’re here”. The whole interaction was fairly damaging — it felt like the only thing that anyone ever saw when looking at me, you know? So, when this doctor asked about my social life, my mum wasted no time in exposing the lie and asking for help. They promised to refer me to a therapist that specialised in working with disabled young people, but I never heard anything. It has been almost nine years and there was never any follow-up.

When I was about twenty, I cried in front of my GP about how bad my body image was (I had been there for an entirely different reason). Afterwards, we both just pretended that it had never happened. In that moment, the only advice that she could give me was to “focus on self-care and personal grooming”.

As I reflect upon these two examples of pivotal moments in my life, it’s difficult for me to even place responsibility or blame onto these professionals in any way. See, the key problem is that nobody truly knows how to help or understand. They can’t really be expected to, since the circumstances are complex beyond anybody’s imagination, so it’s probably not something that they are faced with on a regular basis. However, what it also means is that I’m left unable to truly understand myself, either.

Last night, I had a lengthy conversation with my good friend, Sonia. She is very wise and brilliant. She reminded me of how illness and being constantly surrounded by ignorance (however unintentional) causes your brain to be shaped differently to everyone else around you. You know, studying in a mainstream school when there are so many voices insisting that you don’t belong in that space kind of forces you to become mature very quickly, for example. It is almost like a protective barrier, which only creates a lifetime of difference, since it’s impossible for anyone else to be on exactly the same wavelength without experiencing those things. This is day one of my journey towards accepting and acknowledging that I have been through some heavy stuff, but that things do have the capacity to be better. To anyone reading this, even if we are not in touch, I want to thank you for coming along on the ride with me.

Reminder to self: I do not have to be defined by other people’s shitty treatment of me. It is possible to grow past that and move forward. I am determined to make sure that these experiences mean something.

My next post is going to be about disability and identity. I have some feelings about that myself, but it’d be cool to get some other perspectives, too! If you are disabled or chronically ill and want to have a conversation about it, send me a message. Let’s change the world. xxx

Follow me on Twitter here.

I’m Tired of This Bullshit

Can you believe that it has been almost a month since I last wrote anything here? To be honest, there have been various moments within that time where I have considered giving up the blog completely, purely because it feels like I have run out of insightful things to say. Although 2021 has only just started, I find myself exhausted by all that it has brought, you know? My brain has found everything slightly difficult to handle (which is probably an understatement), making it somewhat impossible to organise my thoughts in any kind of meaningful way. Still, if at least one person can relate to the weird sense of being suffocated by current events, then maybe allowing myself some vulnerability here is worthwhile.

So far, a recurring theme is my lifelong attempt to avoid feeling disabled, in any way that I can. From the optimism that surrounded my previous post, it’s clear that I was beginning to find different (and healthy) strategies for distraction. Oddly enough, I was slowly becoming more comfortable within the uncertainty, desperate to believe that better days would soon be on the horizon. Then, we entered into yet another period of lockdown restrictions. Each time this happens, I’m reminded that my version of normality will never be the same as everyone else’s — there’s always going to be something in the way, something that the vast majority of people will never be able to grasp. Almost overnight, the precarious balancing act that had been whirring inside my mind simply began to crumble. To be totally transparent, I don’t leave my bed unless absolutely necessary anymore. By extension, I also don’t wear anything but pyjamas, unless there’s a very specific reason for me to look like I have my life together. Otherwise, what’s the point?

Right now, the negativity seems to be seeping in from all angles. Slowly, I’m learning that sometimes it’s important to hold hands with the darkness until I feel ready to dig myself out again. I need to grant myself the space to process these emotional hurdles in a healthy way, without the pressures of forcing myself to follow any one particular timeframe. Thankfully, though, I have a Netflix subscription and am currently taking each hour as it comes. (Hit me with any recommendations you might have. We can work our way through the weirdness together. I finished watching Marcella in one day, if that helps.)

With all of that said, I am here with one very specific purpose: to draw attention to disability issues in times of crisis. If you have read this far, hopefully you care enough to stick around for this next part, too. Because every day, there is at least some focus on the news about how the current pandemic is affecting the elderly in care homes. Of course, this is a heartbreaking issue that deserves a significant amount of coverage, but let’s not forget that the same problems are also being faced by disabled people of all ages. Not only does this contribute to the narrative that our lives are not important enough to be included within mainstream conversations, but it also makes it harder to access the relevant support.

This felt like an especially timely point to make after the news that Katie Price’s son, Harvey, will soon be moving into residential college. Just like the elderly in care homes, disabled people in assisted living arrangements have also been disproportionately isolated by the pandemic. They are also not currently allowed visits from family and friends, with some of them not always able to understand why this is necessary. Yet, this is rarely recognised within any media coverage. These people’s lives are not a burden and I refuse to let them be forgotten.

Stay home, wear a mask and don’t be a dick. If you want to read more about the realities behind this story, you can do so here.

PS: although this type of living arrangement is not an immediate reality for me, it likely will be at some point in my future, however distantly. It is nothing to be ashamed of and does not make me any less of a whole human being. Also, to the reader that wanted to know my Starbucks coffee order: I’m more of a hot chocolate gal. xxx

The Shame of Being a Disabled Person

Since childhood, I have carried around a sense of shame about being disabled. Alongside that, I have also been disappointed in myself for having those feelings. It’s impossible to watch the Paralympics (with all of these disabled athletes living their best lives) and not feel like I should be doing more. It’s impossible not to feel like I should be happier and more comfortable with my apparent adversity. All of this was true, until I had a recent realisation:

The pressure to feel better is directly related to allowing others to be more comfortable — to create a space where they don’t perceive me to be living a life that is wasted. Of course, this type of attitude is one that I wish could be removed from society completely, but there is some truth to it. Sometimes, pretending otherwise can be tiring, especially when it only serves to allow people not to feel so awkward when staring at me in the street. Like, it’s apparent from my previous posts here that there are some aspects of my life that have been halted or made more difficult by disability, but happiness is not made nonexistent by such a reality. It is possible to find a weird sense of harmony between the two, which I wish could be more widely understood.

For example: in about February of this year, before the pandemic hit in earnest, I went to Starbucks with my cousin and family. We were happily gossiping about the trails and tribulations of our dating lives at the time, when a stranger approached us and handed me a leaflet. He said that he couldn’t imagine how unbearable my circumstances must be, but that he was willing to help me find “a life without wheels”, through the power of prayer. I’m a loser and hate confrontation, so I politely thanked him and headed into the nearest bathroom to cry. At the time, I had been really struggling with my body image and generally didn’t feel great about myself, so the whole thing was very bad timing. For me, perhaps the saddest part of this interaction was that I’d been having a genuinely nice day, until that moment. I had been laughing in the seconds before he spoke to me, yet he was entirely focused on highlighting the glaringly obvious negativities.

When drafting this post, I had initially wrote: to be honest, I wish that he had been right. I mean, imagine if fixing everything really was that simple. But let’s unpack that idea, in hopes of demonstrating how damaging these well-meaning gestures can be. Firstly, there is no cure for Cerebral Palsy, so taking away my wheelchair would truly be no life at all, even when I do struggle to accept my dependence on it. Secondly, isn’t it heartbreaking that one conversation can leave me feeling so broken? Especially when it probably wasn’t at all significant to the other party.

Moving forward, I will strive to live without shame. Your misplaced guilt and pity is not my problem, so I can promise that I’ll be fine without your prayers. This body is mine, for better or worse. Sometimes, that can be a beautiful thing. Please allow me to try and outweigh the bad with the good throughout 2021. Already, this blog has received more overwhelming love and support than I ever could have hoped for. It has brought a certain strength to my friendships, both old and new. Maybe — just maybe — I’ll never hide in a bathroom again. Let that be my New Year’s Resolution, okay? One blog post at a time. xxx

PS: as promised, here’s a shoutout to my brother, Jack. He wants me to remind everyone that he is, in fact, Carer of the Year. Not really, but still.

If you have a question that you have always felt weird about asking directly, hit me up on CuriousCat! Yay for anonymity. I’m all about that education and will do a post on it in January, if there’s anything. https://curiouscat.qa/Disabled_Danielle97

Why Do I Hate Myself So Much?

In the week that lockdown restrictions have been eased, I felt compelled to make sure that some of the bigger issues are not forgotten. It’s entirely possible that nobody reading this will care at all, but perhaps taking this action can prove something to myself instead: a reminder that my existence can — and does — have value, even within a society that would readily dispose of vulnerable lives in exchange for a trip to the pub with their friends. See, the title of this post asks a big question, I know. In fact, it might make some people feel uncomfortable, in the same way that such raw honesty is wildly outside of my comfort zone. However, it’s also something that I have had no choice but to confront this year, after a lifetime of preferring to pretend that these thoughts were not an issue. Due to a wide variety of medical conditions, I have been shielding since March, even during the periods where advice around this has been more lenient. Almost overnight, all of the coping mechanisms that I had put into place to compensate for how different my life felt to other people’s simply disappeared. Before, I could just about manage the dull ache that I feel in my heart over a lack of healthy romantic opportunities, if I was able to meet friends for coffee. I could just about manage my sadness over never quite feeling confident enough to accept meaningful date invitations, over fears that I would inevitably become a burden, if I could buy my mum dinner instead. I could just about manage my horribly messed up body image, if I could actively plan events to look forward to throughout the year and perform well academically. You get the idea.

So, you can imagine how difficult it was when everything fell apart simultaneously, leaving me with nothing but time to think and fall down the rabbit hole. First, I had to watch as society at large complained about missing out on the various aspects of life that have always been inaccessible to me. For example: I have never been into a nightclub, simply because I am terrified about what might happen in the event of an emergency. Besides, being invisible in a crowd full of drunk people is not my idea of fun. Speaking from experience, it’s very easy for people to forget that I exist when they feel like the responsibility of looking after me will prevent them from having a good time. Then, as life started to regain a semblance of normalcy that I couldn’t participate in, my friendships also became more distant. The negative voice from inside of my head was getting increasingly loud, so it felt as if I no longer had anything to talk about with these people, or support to offer that would have been worthwhile.

In amongst all of this, after an acrimonious couple of months, I have officially taken an extended break from my studies. At the final hurdle, the university offered me almost no support. After making a formal complaint, it has since emerged that this is largely because they don’t know how to properly help their disabled students, particularly during times of crisis. This whole experience was awful, to be honest. I’m still working through the damage that it incurred to my sense of self. Still trying to reassure myself that my existence isn’t pointless without academic validation. But this, combined with everyone’s approach to the pandemic, did allow me to realise one thing: I have been misunderstood and bullied by people throughout my entire life, really only because they have never been given the tools to accept diversity without question. It’s impossible for them to associate disabled lives with anything positive, if they have never been shown any examples. So, that’s what this blog aims to do, alongside helping any other young disabled people that this might reach. You are not alone. Maybe, I’ll even learn to heal myself along the way, too. Yes, there are parts of myself that I don’t have a good relationship with. But I’m learning that it’s because I don’t have any reason to fight against those ideas right now, on a societal level. In the meantime, I will be my own voice for change.

So, check in with your chronically ill and disabled friends right now. Stay safe. Also, please don’t be afraid to ask questions. Conversation is never a bad thing, when it comes from a place of wanting to do better. Besides, I am exhausted by feeling like such an important part of my life and identity is somehow taboo. One blog post at a time. xxx